Monday, 15 August 2016

AN ESTABLISHMENT WRITER 'GETS IT'



In an extraordinary piece recently published at the Wall Street Journal, bastion of the contemporary neocon establishment, a veteran conservative "gatekeeper" journalist cuts to the heart of the treasonous spirit of a quintessential modern Western (mis)ruler.

Although she never uses the term "ethnomasochist," writer Peggy Noonan essentially summons up the concept in discussing the motivations behind the disastrous "open door" migrant policy pursued by German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Noonan writes:
Recently I spoke with an acquaintance of Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, and the conversation quickly turned, as conversations about Ms. Merkel now always do, to her decisions on immigration. Last summer when Europe was engulfed with increasing waves of migrants and refugees from Muslim countries, Ms. Merkel, moving unilaterally, announced that Germany would take in an astounding 800,000. Naturally this was taken as an invitation, and more than a million came. The result has been widespread public furor over crime, cultural dissimilation and fears of terrorism. From such a sturdy, grounded character as Ms. Merkel the decision was puzzling—uncharacteristically romantic about people, how they live their lives, and history itself, which is more charnel house than settlement house.

Ms. Merkel’s acquaintance sighed and agreed. It’s one thing to be overwhelmed by an unexpected force, quite another to invite your invaders in! But, the acquaintance said, he believed the chancellor was operating in pursuit of ideals. As the daughter of a Lutheran minister, someone who grew up in East Germany, Ms. Merkel would have natural sympathy for those who feel marginalized and displaced. Moreover she is attempting to provide a kind of counter-statement, in the 21st century, to Germany’s great sin of the 20th. The historical stain of Nazism, the murder and abuse of the minority, will be followed by the moral triumph of open arms toward the dispossessed. That’s what’s driving it, said the acquaintance.
While comprehending the familiar (if familiarly tiresome) notion of wishing to atone for "historical guilt," however, Noonan also notices something much more crucial: in allegedly attempting to relieve her own sense of responsibility for the sins of countrymen past, Merkel is afflicting countrymen present and future with a grievous and intolerable burden, while essentially exempting herself and her cronies from the consequences of her policies.

In other words, her atonement comes at the expense of her subjects, not herself.
Ms. Merkel had put the entire burden of a huge cultural change not on herself and those like her but on regular people who live closer to the edge, who do not have the resources to meet the burden, who have no particular protection or money or connections. Ms. Merkel, her cabinet and government, the media and cultural apparatus that lauded her decision were not in the least affected by it and likely never would be.

Nothing in their lives will get worse. The challenge of integrating different cultures, negotiating daily tensions, dealing with crime and extremism and fearfulness on the street—that was put on those with comparatively little, whom I’ve called the unprotected. They were left to struggle, not gradually and over the years but suddenly and in an air of ongoing crisis that shows no signs of ending—because nobody cares about them enough to stop it
Merkel's complicity in this crime only worsens when it becomes clear that she and her cronies not only have zero interest in helping their own people, but actually feel a positive contempt for them, to the point where they actually engage in "victim blaming" when refugees behave badly and native Germans are groped, raped, or otherwise attacked:
The powerful show no particular sign of worrying about any of this. When the working and middle class pushed back in shocked indignation, the people on top called them “xenophobic,” “narrow-minded,” “racist.” The detached, who made the decisions and bore none of the costs, got to be called “humanist,” “compassionate,” and “hero of human rights.”

And so the great separating incident at Cologne last New Year’s, and the hundreds of sexual assaults by mostly young migrant men who were brought up in societies where women are veiled—who think they should be veiled—and who chose to see women in short skirts and high heels as asking for it.
In all of this, Merkel is a pardigmatic case of a ruling class representative; that is to say, she represents the rule, and not the exception.
...this is something we are seeing all over, the top detaching itself from the bottom, feeling little loyalty to it or affiliation with it. It is a theme I see working its way throughout the West’s power centers. At its heart it is not only a detachment from, but a lack of interest in, the lives of your countrymen, of those who are not at the table, and who understand that they’ve been abandoned by their leaders’ selfishness and mad virtue-signalling.

On Wall Street, where they used to make statesmen, they now barely make citizens. CEOs are consumed with short-term thinking, stock prices, quarterly profits. They don’t really believe that they have to be involved with “America” now; they see their job as thinking globally and meeting shareholder expectations.

In Silicon Valley the idea of “the national interest” is not much discussed. They adhere to higher, more abstract, more global values. They’re not about America, they’re about . . . well, I suppose they’d say the future.

In Hollywood the wealthy protect their own children from cultural decay, from the sick images they create for all the screens, but they don’t mind if poor, unparented children from broken-up families get those messages and, in the way of things, act on them down the road.
Of course, none of these insights will strike most of our readers as terribly profound. Still, the idea that such common wisdom is now being manifested by a writer like Noonan at an organ like the Wall Street Journal is worth noting.

Read the full article here.

 

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